diet research
Green tea protects against disability in the elderly

A large, prospective cohort study carried out in Japanese seniors has found that consumption of green tea is significantly associated with a lower risk of developing functional disability (problems with daily activities, such as bathing or dressing).

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More benefits of green tea

Green tea extract has been found to lead to improvements in blood pressure, blood sugar levels, cholesterol and markers of inflammation in obese people with high blood pressure.

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Microbial diversity in the gut may protect against allergies

Having a high diversity of bacterial species in the gut may protect babies against developing allergies, according to a comprehensive study of intestinal microflora in allergic and healthy infants, conducted in Sweden.

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Green tea prevents death!

A large epidemiological study carried out in Japan has concluded that green tea consumption is associated with reduced mortality from all diseases.

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Green Tea, Alzheimer's & Cancer

New research conducted at Newcastle University suggests that regular consumption of green tea may protect the brain against developing Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia, as well as cancer.

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Tea drinking cuts heart disease mortality

Drinking several cups of tea daily can cut your risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) by more than a third, according to Dutch researchers.

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Green tea associated with reduced functional disability

A study of nearly 14,000 Japanese elders (65+) found that green tea consumption was associated with a reduced risk of functional disability over the three-year study period, even after adjustment for other possibly confounding lifestyle factors.

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Organic tomatoes really are healthier

A 10-year study comparing organic tomatoes with conventionally grown ones suggests that they may be healthier, confirming pro-organic opinion. Levels of the antioxidant flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol, which have been linked to reduced rates of cardiovascular disease, cancer and dementia, increased significantly over time in samples from organic treatments, whereas they did not vary with conventional fertiliser treatments. The researchers explain the difference as being due to nitrogen availability. Flavonoids are produced by the plants as a defence against nutrient deficiency. Inorganic nitrogen in conventional fertiliser is easily available and the lower levels of flavonoids in conventionally managed plants are therefore probably due to overfertilisation. (Ten-year comparison of the influence of organic and conventional crop management practices on the content of flavonoids in tomatoes. J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Jul 25;55(15):6154-9).

 
Mushroom increases cancer survival rates

A meta-analysis from Hong Kong has provided strong evidence that the fungus Yun Zhi (Coriolus versicolor) can increase survival rates in cancer patients, particularly those suffering from carcinoma of the breast, stomach and colon.

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Fatty foods limit the effect of sadness

Fatty foods can make people less vulnerable to sadness, even if they are unaware of the fat content in the food they are eating.

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Vegetarian diet protects against diverticular disease

A UK study has shown that vegetarians are a third less likely to suffer from diverticular disease than meat eaters.

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Very low calorie diet reverses diabetes

An extreme eight-week diet can reverse type 2 diabetes in recently diagnosed patients, say British researchers.

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Broccoli’s anti-cancer activity depends on cooking method

The cooking method used to prepare broccoli can make a significant difference to its cancer-fighting abilities.

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Eat healthily to reverse diabetes risk

A British team has examined whether adhering to the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) can help reverse metabolic syndrome (a cluster of risk factors for heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes).

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Vitamin D deficiency linked with childhood obesity

A study from Columbia has linked vitamin D deficiency with childhood obesity.

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An apple a day keeps cholesterol at bay

Daily consumption of dried apple has been shown to help weight loss and improve levels of cholesterol and inflammatory markers in post-menopausal women.

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Honey can reverse antibiotic resistance

The antibacterial effects of honey have long been recognised in traditional medicine.

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Tea drinking cuts heart disease mortality

Drinking several cups of tea daily can cut your risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) by more than a third, according to Dutch researchers.

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Leafy greens protect against diabetes

A systematic review by British authors has concluded that eating a diet rich in green leafy vegetables may lower the risk of developing type-2 diabetes.

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Fish oil reduces breast cancer risk

Postmenopausal women who take fish oil supplements may reduce their breast cancer risk, suggests an American study.

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Saturated fats not linked to heart disease

A new systematic review refutes the association between dietary saturated fat intake and increased risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and cardiovascular disease (CVD).

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Butter leads to lower blood fats than olive oil

A study from Sweden shows that butter leads to considerably less elevation of blood fats after a meal, compared with olive oil and canola-flaxseed oil.

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Fish oil protects against psychosis

Individuals at high risk of psychosis appear less likely to develop psychotic disorders following a 12-week course of fish oil capsules containing high amounts of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).

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Beetroot juice boosts stamina by increasing blood nitrate

Chinese nutritional theory has always held that beetroot has Blood-nourishing properties.

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Cranberry juice fights bacteria at molecular level

A US team has identified the molecular mechanism that enables cranberry juice to fight off urinary tract infections.

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Blueberry juice improves seniors’ memory

Drinking blueberry juice has a measurable effect on learning and world list recall in older adults.

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Thyme and other essential oils suppress inflammation

Essential oils from six different herbs have been demonstrated to reduce the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis), which plays a key role in inflammation.

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Apple juice improves mood for Alzheimer's patients

Apple juice has a positive effect on the mood states of people who suffer from Alzheimer's disease (AD).

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Bitter melon fights breast cancer cells

Bitter melon (Ku Gua, Momordica charantia), a vegetable commonly used in Chinese cooking and medicine, shows promise as an anti-breast cancer agent.

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Curry component kills cancer cells

Irish scientists have discovered that curcumin, a component of turmeric which is a common curry ingredient, can kill oesophageal cancer cells in vitro.

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Mediterranean diet may delay need for diabetes drugs

By following a low-carbohydrate Mediterranean diet, newly diagnosed diabetics may be able to postpone their need for medication.

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Virgin olive oil rich in phenol compounds suppresses inflammation

A diet rich in the phenolic components of virgin olive oil can suppress the expression of genes involved in inflammation, which may explain the reduced risk of cardiovascular disease seen in people who follow a Mediterranean diet.

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Mediterranean diet prevents erectile dysfunction in diabetics

Italian researchers have found that in men with type two diabetes, stricter adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED).

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Healthy diet helps generate brain cells

Spanish researchers have determined that a diet rich in polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (termed the LMN diet) stimulates neurogenesis – the production and differentiation of the brain’s stem cells into various types of new neurones.

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Flaxseed protects against osteoporosis

The addition of flaxseed oil to the diet could reduce the risk of osteoporosis in post-menopausal and diabetic women.

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Processed foods linked with depression

UK researchers have discovered a link between processed foods and depression.

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Mediterranean diet prevents depression

People who follow a Mediterranean diet (rich in monounsaturated fats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains and fish) have a reduced risk of developing depression, according to Spanish research.

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Western diet turns on fat genes

A diet high in fat and sugar has a double-whammy effect on the waistline, because it switches on genes that cause fat to be stored, according to new research.

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When you eat as important as what you eat

The Chinese belief that meal timing is important to health is being backed up by Western science.

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Vegan nuns have same bone density as meat eaters

A study comparing the bone health of vegan Buddhist nuns with non-vegetarian women has found that their bone density was identical.

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Diet and heart disease

A systematic review of the evidence for links between dietary factors and coronary heart disease shows that strong evidence supports the association of intake of vegetables and nuts and a Mediterranean diet as protective factors, while intake of trans-fatty acids and foods with high glycaemic index are identified as harmful factors.

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Health benefits of Mediterranean diet dissected

A large Greek prospective cohort study (23,349 participants) has investigated the relative importance of the individual components of the Mediterranean diet.

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Thinking increases calorie intake

An American research team has demonstrated that intellectual work leads to a substantial increase in calorie intake.

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Mediterranean diet protects against cognitive decline

Older people who follow a Mediterranean diet are less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and less likely to progress from MCI to Alzheimer's disease (AD).

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Diet and exercise reduce cancer

Over 40% of bowel and breast cancer cases in the UK would be prevented by healthy diet, physical activity and weight maintenance, according to a landmark report that sets out recommendations for policies to reduce the global number of cancer cases.

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Low-carb diets better at controlling diabetes

Very low-carbohydrate diets, consisting of foods with the lowest-possible glycemic index rating, lead to greater improvement in blood sugar control.

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Dark chocolate may help weight loss

Danish scientists have shown that dark chocolate is far more filling than milk chocolate, lessening subsequent cravings for sweet, salty and fatty foods.

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Diet drinks associated with diabetes

Daily consumption of fizzy diet drinks is associated with significantly greater risks for metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and type-2 diabetes, according to an observational study carried out in the USA.

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Mediterranean diet prevents chronic diseases

Adherence to a Mediterranean diet can provide protection against major chronic diseases including heart disease, cancer, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, according to a new systematic review and meta-analysis by Italian investigators.

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Fish and birds in childhood prevent eczema

A Swedish cohort study of 4921 infants has found that introducing fish into the children’s diet before nine months of age decreased their likelihood of developing eczema by 24%.

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Dark chocolate in moderation reduces inflammation

Dark chocolate contains high concentrations of flavonoids and may have anti-inflammatory properties.

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Berry compound reduces effects of ageing

A diet rich in antioxidant compounds from berries and grapes has been shown to reverse cognitive decline and improve memory in laboratory animals of advanced age.

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Broccoli could reverse diabetic heart damage

Eating broccoli could reverse diabetes-induced damage to coronary blood vessels, according to a British research team.

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Eating until full and eating quickly triple obesity risk

A combination of eating until full and eating quickly may increase the risk for becoming overweight by three-fold.

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Coffee may help protect against type 2 diabetes

Regular consumption of coffee (and possibly black tea) is associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes according to the results of a cohort study involving 36,908 Singaporean Chinese men and women.

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Coffee may be good

Higher coffee consumption is associated with lower liver cancer risk.

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Soya bad for sperm

Eating soya-based food may lower sperm count and play a role in male infertility, especially in obese men, according to Harvard researchers.

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Red yeast rice good for heart

A large clinical study carried out in China, on patients who had suffered a heart attack, found that an extract of Chinese red yeast rice (hong qu mi) significantly reduced the rate of a second heart attack.

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Vitamin C lowers diabetes risk

A cohort study from the UK has found that higher plasma vitamin C levels are associated with a decreased risk for type 2 diabetes.

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Vegan diet protects rheumatoid arthritis patients from cardiovascular disease

Eating a gluten-free vegan diet could protect rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients against heart attacks and stroke.

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Coffee and tea protect against stroke

Drinking large quantities of coffee or tea every day appears to protect male smokers against stroke.

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Mediterranean diet prevents diabetes

A Mediterranean diet provides significant protection against type 2 diabetes.

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Dash for heart health

Adherence to the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet is associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease and stroke among middle-aged women.

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Almonds promote growth of good bacteria

Tests in a device that simulates the human digestive system have concluded that almonds can act as an effective prebiotic,

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A glass of wine for your liver’s sake

Modest wine consumption, defined as one glass a day, may decrease your chances of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

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Flavonoids protect smokers against cancer

A case-control study of 558 lung cancer cases has found that lung cancer is inversely associated with the consumption of antioxidant plant flavonoids among tobacco smokers, but not among non-smokers.

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Plant foods preserve muscle mass

Western diets rich in protein, cereal grains and other acid-producing foods lead to the development of metabolic acidosis with age, triggering muscle wastage.

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Oats for cholesterol reduction

A review of recent research strongly supports the link between eating oatmeal and lowering cholesterol levels.

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Sweet drinks linked to gout

Consumption of sugar sweetened soft drinks and fructose is strongly associated with an increased risk of gout in men.

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Steam your greens

Some cooking methods can preserve, and even boost, the nutrient content of vegetables.

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Honey better than drugs for kids’ night-time coughs

Honey is more effective at soothing children’s night-time coughs than over-the-counter antitussive medication.

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High meat intake linked to cancer

Data from a very large US health study are providing convincing information on the links between various diet and lifestyle factors and a variety of diseases.

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Mediterranean diet and regular exercise prevent death

Eating a Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of death from all causes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Researchers assessed conformity with the Mediterranean diet in 380,296 of the participants of the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, with no history of chronic disease.

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Vitamin D protects against heart disease and cancer

Vitamin D deficiency is already known to be associated with osteoporosis, now two new studies suggest that it may also be associated with heart disease and poorer prognosis for some cancers.

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Eat three meals a day

Eating regular meals is better for health than eating one large meal a day.

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Obesity linked with cancer risk

Being overweight increases the risk of developing many forms of cancer.

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Apples and fish during pregnancy protect against atopy

Intake of apples and fish by women during pregnancy may reduce the risk of their children developing atopic conditions, according to the results of a longitudinal cohort study of nearly 2000 Dutch children.

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‘Fruity’ vegetables and fish reduce atopy

Another mother and child study, this time from the Spanish island of Menorca, supports a potential protective effect of ‘fruity’ vegetables and fish intake during childhood on wheeze and atopy respectively.

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Caffeine and miscarriage

Too much caffeine during pregnancy may double the risk of miscarriage.

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Fast for a healthy heart

New research suggests that Mormons' habit of fasting for one day a month may benefit their hearts.

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Diet improves fertility

Following a ‘fertility diet’ may favourably influence fertility in otherwise healthy women.

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Food restriction increases rats’ pleasure

A brain-imaging study of genetically obese rats has added to existing evidence that dopamine, the neurotransmitter associated with reward, pleasure, movement and motivation, plays a role in obesity.

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Diet and diabetes

Research into the impact of diet on diabetes is showing that a variety of nutritional interventions can help prevent or ameliorate both forms of the disease, confirming the theories of traditional Chinese medicine.

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Eat less, stay fit

Caloric restriction has previously been shown to extend lifespan in animal models.

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Diet and dementia

A recent article by Canadian authors highlights associations between dietary choices and risk of dementia.

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Refined carbs are bad for the eyes

People who eat more refined carbohydrates have a higher risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the retinal disease that is the leading cause of blindness.

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Coffee may increase hypertension

Coffee drinking seems to increase the risk of requiring antihypertensive drug treatment.

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LATEST NEWS

Yoga Stops Traffick Fundraiser - 11 March, 12-13.30
On the 11th of March 2017 the Brighton yoga community will roll out their mats and do 108 Sun Salutations (or whatever you can) to support Yoga Stops Traffick and The Odanadi Seva Trust - Find out more, join and donate here... ... read more
NEW! Monday lunchtime flow yoga drop-in...
Starts Feb 6th, Mondays 1-2pm:  Slow flow yoga - Ideal for a lunchtime workout!  Return to your desk feeling energised, calm and focused. Suitable for all levels. ... read more
Alexander Technique workshop, Saturday 25 February
Suffering from neck or back pain? The Alexander Technique is about looking at ‘what we’re up to’ in our daily lives. ... read more
Therapeutic Sound Bath, Sunday 26 February
Relax and come into balance with the healing power of sound with Catherine Hutchinson. ... read more
Butoh Dance workshop, Sunday 26 February
Mim King leads an afternoon workshop exploring the main themes of Butoh dance. ... read more

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