tai chi and qigong research
Tai chi reduces insomnia in breast cancer survivors

Tai chi relieves insomnia in breast cancer survivors equally as well as the 'gold standard' cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), according to an article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology

Read more...
 
More positive taichi and qigong reserach

Taichi is the subject of frequent research nowadays ... qigong less so, although the practices often overlap so closely that the findings will generally apply equally to both ... you commonly get these fashions in research. A batch of studies has been published recently. Read on to see how taichi is the best training for reducing the risk of falling in older people, that it benefits acute and chronic pain and our reaction to it, and that it increases our neurophysical functioning (brain-body connection) and heart health

Read more...
 
Tai chi effective for managing cancer-related fatigue

Tai chi is an effective intervention for managing fatigue in patients with lung cancer undergoing chemotherapy, a Chinese study has found

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves physical performance in chronic conditions

Tai chi can improve physical performance in people suffering from a variety of chronic health conditions, according to a systematic review carried out in Canada

Read more...
 
Qigong benefits breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

A preliminary study from Taiwan suggests that both static and moving forms of qigong practice are beneficial for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

Read more...
 
Tai chi has vascular benefits in rheumatoid arthritis

Tai chi can improve endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness in elderly women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

Read more...
 
Tai chi effective for managing cancer-related fatigue

Tai chi is an effective intervention for managing fatigue in patients with lung cancer undergoing chemotherapy, a Chinese study has found.

Read more...
 
Tai chi helps reduce inflammation and cardiovascular disease risk in women

Practising tai chi (TC) can help reduce pro-inflammatory factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in women, according to American researchers.

Read more...
 
Tai chi benefits the heart

A meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Heart Association suggests that tai chi and qigong can offer real benefits for people with cardiovascular disease. The study found reductions in blood pressure enough to reduce the risk of stroke by up to 41% and coronary heart disease by 22%. Practitioners also showed improved quality of life and reduced levels of depression compared to controls. http://jaha.ahajournals.org/content/5/3/e002562.full?sid=2972b6f1-3507-45cd-9460-85321a892915

 
Tai chi prevents falling

Another study has confirmed the great benefits of tai chi in preventing falls. Older adults with a history of falling were assigned to a tai chi group (one hour class weekly for six months) or a lower extremity training (LET) class (stretching, muscle strengthening and balance training). At the end of the study, the tai chi participants were significantly less likely to have fallen (reaching 50% less after a year). http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.13952/abstract

 
Tai chi improves chronic conditions

September's British Journal of Sports Medicine published a meta-analysis of tai chi studies showing that for people with multiple chronic conditions (cancer, arthritis, heart failure and COPD) it can build muscle strength, improve walking speed, reduce depression and reduce pain.

http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2015/09/04/bjsports-2014-094388.abstract?sid=b9e6404c-5b2a-48eb-93b6-fd3ebf6269c6

 
Tai chi benefits patients with chronic conditions

A Chinese systematic review has concluded that tai chi has positive effects on health-related quality of life in patients with chronic conditions

Read more...
 
Tai chi promising for MS

Tai chi holds therapeutic potential for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, according to a German pilot study

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves risk of chronic disease in senior cancer survivors

Tai chi (TC) exercise may help reduce risk factors for chronic disease in senior survivors of cancer

Read more...
 
Baduanjin (8 Brocades) qigong improves physical health

Chinese investigators report that baduanjin qigong training can significantly improve markers of physical health in healthy adults

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves balance in elders

Tai chi practice can help older adults maintain their balance, according to a study from a US author

Read more...
 
Long-term tai chi prevents depression

A study by a joint Chinese/Japanese research team suggests that long-term tai chi training may prevent depression

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves fitness and lung function in COPD

Hong Kong researchers have concluded that tai chi is a useful exercise for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, and can lead to sustained improvements in their health.

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves cognitive function in elders

Tai Chi can enhance cognitive function in older adults, particularly in the realm of executive functioning and in individuals without significant impairment, concludes a systematic review from the USA.

Read more...
 
Tai chi reduces falls after stroke

Research from the USA has found that a 12-week tai chi (TC) intervention was more effective in reducing fall rates for stroke survivors than either strength training or usual care.

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves attention

Tai chi (TC) training helps improve attention in healthy young adults, according to American researchers.

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves balance in Parkinson’s patients

A Chinese research team has found that tai chi (TC) can improve balance and decrease fall risks in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves blood parameters in hypertension patients

Tai chi (TC) has beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) and levels of gaseous cellular signaling molecules in the blood of patients with essential hypertension (EH).

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves neuromuscular function in the elderly

Tai chi is as effective as proprioception exercises for improving neuromuscular function in elderly people, according to Chinese researchers.

Read more...
 
Tai chi decreases numbers of inflammatory cells in the blood

One hour of tai chi practice can decrease the numbers of pro-inflammatory lymphocytes circulating in the blood stream, a US pilot study suggests.

Read more...
 
Tai chi for knee osteoarthritis

A systematic review by Danish authors has found moderate evidence for short-term improvement of pain, physical function and stiffness in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who practice tai chi.

Read more...
 
Tai chi is a more effective ‘antioxidant’ than walking

A Mexican research team reports that practising tai chi produces a greater antioxidant effect in the body than walking.

Read more...
 
Tai chi can reshape the brain

Chinese scientists report that long-term tai chi practice can induce regional structural changes in practitioners’ brains.

Read more...
 
Qigong for chronic fatigue

A Hong Kong study has found that compared to controls, qigong (10 bi-weekly classes and 12 weeks home practice) significantly improved total fatigue, physical fatigue and depression in patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23983785

 
Qigong and breast cancer

A Chinese study published in the journal Cancer reports that just five weekly sessions of qigong resulted in reduced depression and fatigue in women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer, compared to controls.

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves immunity in lung cancer survivors

Chinese researchers have concluded that tai chi may be able to improve immune status in lung cancer survivors, and thereby potentially help to prevent tumour recurrence.

Read more...
 
Qigong has anti-depressive effect on elders

A pilot study from Hong Kong has provided preliminary evidence for the hypotheses that the anti-depressive effect of qigong exercise is due to improvement in psychosocial functioning and down-regulation of hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

Read more...
 
Tai chi beneficial for diabetics

Practising tai chi is beneficial for diabetic patients with neuropathy, according to Korean investigators who recruited 59 diabetic patients with neuropathy to a study.

Read more...
 
Tai chi reduces reactivity to stress

Swiss researchers have found that tai chi practice can reduce psychobiological stress reactivity in healthy subjects.

Read more...
 
Qigong helps physiotherapists with burnout

A preliminary study from Portugal suggests that practicing a short daily qigong routine can be an effective tool for the self-management of burnout in physiotherapists.

Read more...
 
Tai chi reduces falls among stroke survivors

People who survive strokes are seven times more likely to suffer falls than healthy adults, resulting in fractures, decreased mobility and fear of further falling resulting in social isolation.

Read more...
 
Tai chi beneficial in rheumatoid arthritis

A pilot study suggests that practicing tai chi can help people suffering from rheumatoid arthritis both mentally and physically.

Read more...
 
Tai chi helps seniors with depression

A meta-analysis suggests that tai chi can help reduce symptoms of depression in older adults.

Read more...
 
Tai chi increases brain size and improves memory in seniors

A joint Chinese-US research team has found that practising tai chi leads to increased brain volume and improved cognitive function in elderly people.

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves balance and walking in Parkinson’s patients

Practising tai chi twice a week can help Parkinson's patients improve their balance and walking ability, according to an American study.

Read more...
 
Tai chi promotes arterial flexibility and muscle strength

Seniors who practice tai chi regularly demonstrate improved arterial compliance (the ability of arteries to expand and contract with the pumping of the heart), as well as increased leg muscle strength, according to a Hong Kong study.

Read more...
 
Tai chi in space

Not exactly research but how often do you get to see tai chi performed in space: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wl6sjHGK5bg

 
Qigong benefits chronic fatigue syndrome

A team from Hong Kong has found that a four-month programme of qigong exercise helped ease symptoms and improve biological markers of disease-related stress in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

Read more...
 
Tai chi increases brain volume

Tai chi has been shown to increase brain volume in older people, as well as improve memory and thinking test scores.

Read more...
 
Tai chi plus drugs improves geriatric depression

A US team has found that the use of tai chi alongside drug therapy may provide additional improvements in clinical outcomes in the treatment of geriatric depression.

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves neuropsychological functioning in cancer survivors

Tai chi may promote gains in neuropsychological functioning in breast cancer survivors, according to a pilot study by American researchers.

Read more...
 
Tai chi increases testosterone and improves prostate symptoms

Korean research suggests that tai chi can improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs), quality of life (QoL) and testosterone levels in patients with benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH).

Read more...
 
Tai chi and arterial flexibility

The essence of the Chinese internal martial arts is to harmonise strength and softness.

Read more...
 
Tai chi adds benefit to cardiac rehabilitation

The addition of tai chi to endurance training (ET) leads to improved exercise tolerance and quality of life (QOL) in elderly patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), according to an Italian study.

Read more...
 
Tai chi outperforms physiotherapy in preventing falls

Tai chi has a better impact on preventing falls in the elderly than conventional physiotherapy, perhaps because it leads to an increased sense of self-efficacy in practitioners.

Read more...
 
Qigong improves diabetic health

Taking part in a programme of qigong exercise may be beneficial for people with type-2 diabetes, according to an RCT carried out in Australia.

Read more...
 
Tai chi better than usual care for low back pain

The first pragmatic randomised controlled trial of tai chi for people with low back pain has shown that it can improve pain and disability outcomes in this population.

Read more...
 
Qigong prevents swimmers from catching colds

Practising qigong may protect elite swimmers from upper respiratory tract infections (URIs), US researchers have found.

Read more...
 
Qigong improves quality of life

People who practice qigong report improved health-related quality of life compared with non-practitioners, according to a study from Taiwan.

Read more...
 
Qigong has multiple benefits for cancer patients

An Australian team has found that taking part in a qigong exercise programme has multiple health benefits for cancer patients.

Read more...
 
Qigong improves blood-pressure in wheelchair-bound elderly

The findings of a Chinese study suggest that qigong exercise may help improve blood pressure in elderly wheelchair-bound adults.

Read more...
 
Qigong improves children’s wellbeing at school

Qigong lessons for children offer a possible way to improve wellbeing at school, according to research carried out in Sweden.

Read more...
 
Qigong benefits neck pain

A German team has compared qigong and exercise therapy in patients with chronic neck pain.

Read more...
 
Qigong effective for tinnitus

German researchers report that qigong training could be a useful adjunctive therapy for patients with tinnitus.

Read more...
 
External qigong can ease chronic pain

External qigong treatment (EQT) can significantly reduce subjective feelings of pain in patients suffering from a variety of chronic pain conditions.

Read more...
 
The effects of Qigong meditation on the prefrontal cortex

A Canadian study has provided evidence that qigong meditation has a significant effect on the activation of the brain’s prefrontal cortex.

Read more...
 
Qigong improves addiction treatment outcomes

A small pilot study from the USA suggests that qigong meditation can contribute positively to addiction treatment outcomes, with results at least as good as those of an established stress management program.

Read more...
 
Qigong effective for type 2 diabetes

An American study has found that 12 weeks of qigong therapy resulted in significant reductions in fasting glucose levels in patients with type two diabetes.

Read more...
 
Qigong training improves computer operators' stress

A study has investigated the effects of qigong on stress among computer operators.

Read more...
 
Qigong and drug addiction

A study carried out at the Changzhou Drug Treatment Centre in China by Prof. Kevin Chen (of the University of Medicine & Dentistry, Newark, New Jersey) and two Chinese colleagues, has examined the potential benefit of qigong in heroin addiction.

Read more...
 
Qigong and exercise therapy reduce neck pain

Qigong and exercise therapy are both effective at reducing chronic neck pain.

Read more...
 
Qigong training improves exercise capacity in cardiac impairment

Qigong training can increase the exercise capacity of patients with cardiac impairment.

Read more...
 
Pain, the brain and qigong

Functional changes relating to pain processing occur in the brain during the practice of qigong.

Read more...
 
Qigong enhances flu shot

Researchers in the USA have found that a combination of tai chi and qigong (TQ) can enhance older adults' immune responses to the flu vaccine.

Read more...
 
How does qigong improve balance?

The mechanisms by which tai chi can improve balance were investigated in a randomised controlled trial of 49 healthy older adults.

Read more...
 
Qigong for metabolic syndrome

A 12-week programme of tai chi and qigong prompted a significant fall in blood glucose levels and significant improvements in other indicators of metabolic syndrome in 11 middle-aged to older adults.

Read more...
 
More motivation means more qigong and better concentration

A study from Sweden has investigated whether self-determined motivation and perceived stress are related to concentration during qigong exercise, and to the amount of exercise carried out.

Read more...
 
30 minutes qigong is enough to improve mood

Forty-one regular qigong practitioners engaged in either 30 or 60 minutes of qigong exercise within a randomised cross-over design.

Read more...
 
Qigong for stress

A small American study has investigated the effectiveness of a qigong training program in reducing stress in hospital staff.

Read more...
 
Qigong enhances sleep and psychological wellbeing

Spanish scientists have assessed the effects of qigong practice on serum cytokines, mood and subjective sleep quality.

Read more...
 
Effects of qigong on saliva

An Iranian team has analysed the effects of a qigong program on various saliva parameters, including volume, pH and secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) levels.

Read more...
 
Qigong studies

A randomised pilot study has found that eight weeks of qigong improved self-esteem and mood in individuals with traumatic brain injury compared with controls.

Read more...
 
Qigong for brain injury

A randomised pilot study has examined the effects of qigong on individuals with traumatic brain injury. Twenty individuals with traumatic brain injury attended either a qigong exercise session or a non-exercise-based leisure activity, for one hour per week over eight weeks.

Read more...
 
Lasting benefits of qigong meditation

Brain scans of meditators show that the effects of long-term meditation practice are carried over into non-meditating states.

Read more...
 
Psychophysiological outcomes of qigong

Hong Kong investigators have attempted to unravel the clinical benefits and underlying psychophysiological mechanisms of qigong based on information from 26 published RCTs.

Read more...
 
Qigong decreases inflammation in cancer patients

In Australia, a team investigating the use of medical qigong therapy (MQ) has found that it can improve cancer patients' quality of life (QOL).

Read more...
 
Qigong beneficial for chronic fatigue

A small, uncontrolled UK pilot study has found evidence of benefit for qigong in treating chronic fatigue.

Read more...
 
Qigong for knee osteoarthritis

Forty-four elderly subjects (mean age 69) with knee osteoarthritis were randomised to an eight-week tai chi qigong training programme or a waiting list control group.

Read more...
 
Qigong effective for type 2 diabetes

An American study has found that 12 weeks of qigong therapy resulted in significant reductions in fasting glucose levels in patients with type two diabetes.

Read more...
 
Tai chi benefits Parkinson's patients

In a four-year study of 195 subjects with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease, tai chi has been found to  improve postural stability and walking ability and to reduce the risk of falling.

Read more...
 
Voluntary control over autonomic processes via tai chi and meditation

Physiological responses normally associated with involuntary autonomic thermoregulation can be voluntarily activated during a tai chi exercise.

Read more...
 
Tai chi prevents weight gain in breast cancer survivors

Tai chi can help prevent weight gain and maintain lean body mass in breast cancer survivors by stabilising insulin levels, say American researchers.

Read more...
 
Tai chi reduces inflammation

Practising tai chi can lead to a reduction in levels of inflammatory markers in the blood of older adults.

Read more...
 
Tai chi helps overcome cognitive effects of chemotherapy

A US pilot study suggests that tai chi may be able to help cancer patients with cognitive problems that can arise as a side effect of chemotherapy treatment.

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves post-menopausal health

Taking part in a 12-week tai chi programme has multiple health benefits for post-menopausal women, particularly for those suffering from age-related loss of muscle strength.

Read more...
 
Tai chi beneficial in heart failure

Tai chi exercise has measurable benefits for patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HF).

Read more...
 
Seniors who practice tai chi perform better in cognitive tests

Older adults who practice tai chi (TC) demonstrate better performance in cognitive tests than those who take part in conventional exercise or who do not exercise.

Read more...
 
A single tai chi class is psychologically beneficial

A UK study has shown that participating in a single tai chi class is associated with significant improvements in psychological wellbeing.

Read more...
 
Tai chi prevents cognitive decline in at-risk seniors

Hong Kong researchers have found that tai chi (TC) may offer specific cognitive benefits in elderly people at risk of progressive cognitive decline.

Read more...
 
Tai chi improves metabolic parameters in obese diabetics

Tai chi (TC) can improve metabolic parameters in obese diabetic patients, according to Taiwanese researchers.

Read more...
 
20 minutes of tai chi benefits type A personalities

A Japanese study has investigated the influence of personality type on the change in mood status after a brief period of tai chi (TC).

Read more...
 
Taichi qigong improves lung function in COPD

A three-month programme of simplified (13-form) taichi qigong (two x sixty minute sessions a week) was found to be superior to both an exercise group (walking plus breathing techniques) and a control group (usual activities) in improving symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Read more...
 
Taichi qigong improves lung function in COPD

A three-month programme of simplified (13-form) taichi qigong (two x sixty minute sessions a week) was found to be superior to both an exercise group (walking plus breathing techniques) and a control group (usual activities) in improving symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Read more...
 
Tai chi helps beat depression in the elderly

Combining a weekly Tai Chi Chih (TCC) exercise class with standard depression treatment leads to greater improvement in depression symptoms for elderly adults.

Read more...
 
Tai chi and green tea benefit women's bone health

A study by an American research team has demonstrated that tai chi exercise (TC) and supplementation with green tea polyphenols (GTP) can benefit bone remodeling and muscle strength in postmenopausal women by reducing oxidative stress damage.

Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 Next > End >>

LATEST NEWS

Transform - Yoga Workshop, Saturday 24 June
How do you respond to change? Are you experiencing a time of challenging shifts in work, life, physicality? ... read more
Butoh Dance workshop, Sunday 25 June
Mim King leads an afternoon workshop exploring the main themes of Butoh dance. ... read more
Yin Yoga with Myofascial Release workshop, Saturday 8 April
For people who sit a lot! Are you a deskbound worker? Do you spend a lot of time driving or sitting on public transport? Is your lifestyle sedentary? ... read more
'Becoming aware of our energy centres' Scaravelli Yoga workshop, Saturday 8 July
Join Jane Manze for an afternoon of Scaravelli inspired yoga practice and somatic movement. ... read more

HOME | INFO | CLASSES | WORKSHOPS | TIMETABLE | COMMUNITY | NEWS | PRIVACY | TERMS & CONDITIONS

©2009  Brighton Natural Health Centre 27 Regent Street Brighton BN1 1UL - tel 01273 600010 - email info@bnhc.co.uk - Registered Charity No: 290122